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cost to build per sqaure

How much does a home cost to build per square or per metre?

Here at Hensley Park Homes, we get asked the question a lot – how much do your homes cost per square? – or a similar question – how much do your homes cost to build per square metre?
It’s an interesting question and we’d like to try and answer it in this article for everyone’s benefit, not just those that are looking at building a Hensley Park Home.


But before we delve into the answer, we think it’s important to make sure the method of measurement is clearly understood.

A square metre is straightforward – 1mtr X 1mtr or 100cm X 100cm, or in a tradies language, 1000mm X 1000mm. But this is very different to a square. A square, commonly known as a builder’s square, is 100 square feet, or 10 feet X 10 feet. This equates to 9.29 square metres.

Metric is obviously the recognised method of measuring a home, but the old builders square is still very prevalent in the home buyers market, so it pays to be aware of both.

So, onto the question of how much a home cost to build per square or square metre.

Core Costs

A home includes a wide variety of materials, fittings and fixtures, and all of these involve some form of manual labour to put it all together, and of course there’s other periphery costs such as freight, supervision, permits, documentation, consultancy, etc. Some of these materials and the associated labour are very relevant to the overall size or area of the home, such as roofing, flooring, insulation and plasterboard for the ceiling.
But many of the costs bear very little semblance to the area of a home, such as the kitchen, the appliances, tapware, window size and light fittings. Of course, the bigger a home, the more lights it will have, and it will most likely have a larger kitchen and probably 2 bathrooms.
These costs are called ‘core’ costs – kitchen, bathroom, laundry, heating & cooling, etc. They’re costs that stay relatively constant regardless of the size of the home. This means that a much larger home would have a lower cost per square than a smaller home.

Level of Finish

Another influencer of the cost per square metre is the level of fittings and finishes. We’re not talking quality here (more on that in a minute) but how many bells and whistles the home has.
One home might have high-end appliances, 3mtr ceilings, marble kitchen benches and the best tapware that money can buy, but have the same area as a home with the most basic of inclusions – this will obviously create a stark difference in the square metre rate for the 2 homes.

Quality

And the 3rd consideration is quality. This can be puzzling for some people, but it’s a reality that there are different levels of workmanship out there in the building industry. Just like buying a pen. You can buy a 99c biro from the cheap shop or you can get a nice gel pen for $6 from the stationery shop or spend big dollars on a Parker from the newsagent. They all do the same thing, but there’s a huge difference in the quality.

Point of Measurement?

And one final point: what is the area that’s being measured? Does it include the eaves overhang? Does it include verandahs and decking? Does it include the garage or carport? Alfresco? Porch? When the total price of a home is spread over a larger area, the rate will clearly be lower.

When all of these factors are considered, you will come up with rates between $750 to $4,500 per square metre (or $6,970 to $42,000 per builders square).

Apples with Oranges?

This is a very broad range but it’s the correct answer to the question because there are just so many variables. You might work hard to compare apples with apples instead of apples with oranges as the saying goes, but in our observations we’ve seen potential buyers comparing apples with airplanes and then they wonder why they’re confused.

It’s important to make sure you’re getting value for money when you build a new home, and the best way to do this is to be very aware of how your planned build stacks up against these considerations before doing your comparisons.

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